Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login
×




Details

Submitted on
July 27, 2008
Image Size
532 KB
Resolution
1000×1000
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
10,910 (1 today)
Favourites
83 (who?)
Comments
92

License

Creative Commons License
Some rights reserved. This work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.
×
Organic web design by Kip0130 Organic web design by Kip0130
A fictional Website , company , etc for sale i guess. I have some more work to do to it like a depth filled Bg. This was exclusively made for my college portfolio submission so any suggestion's wanted.
Add a Comment:
 

Daily Deviation

Given 2008-08-02
Organic web design by =Kip0130 is a clean design that uses smooth typefaces, relaxing colors, and an overall fluid style to convey meaning to the viewer. ( Featured by lemontea )
:iconolliversb:
olliversb Featured By Owner Nov 14, 2010
i like it, it looks very nice ;)
Reply
:iconrc-man-design:
RC-man-Design Featured By Owner Aug 18, 2009  Student Interface Designer
Nice template man :)
Reply
:iconaimanstudio:
AimanStudio Featured By Owner Jan 4, 2009  Professional Digital Artist
I like its color harmony, It's perfect.. keep up the great work man. :)
Reply
:iconszc:
szc Featured By Owner Sep 30, 2008
love it :)
Reply
:iconbananasplit1:
Bananasplit1 Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2008
I'm jealous of your DD

:)
Reply
:iconkip0130:
Kip0130 Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2008
lol don't be.
Reply
:iconbananasplit1:
Bananasplit1 Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2008
I'm just messing with you :)
It looks great.
Reply
:icondanlev:
danlev Featured By Owner Aug 5, 2008  Hobbyist Photographer
I like the width. I can't help but to think the "since 1992" "column" should be wider, extending closer to the right column.

Nice work though :)
Reply
:iconkip0130:
Kip0130 Featured By Owner Aug 5, 2008
thank you it means a lot coming from you.
Reply
:icondanlev:
danlev Featured By Owner Aug 5, 2008  Hobbyist Photographer
Oh, and you might want to check your monitor's contrast/color. There's some very light gray texture behind the plant that doesn't look like it should be there. :hug:
Reply
:iconstudio-fubar:
Studio-Fubar Featured By Owner Aug 3, 2008
Stunningly gorgeous. The simplicity of this design coupled with the touching aspect of nature really makes this a breath of fresh air.
Reply
:iconzcollvee:
zcollvee Featured By Owner Aug 3, 2008   Interface Designer
this is great!
Reply
:iconscottydm:
ScottyDM Featured By Owner Aug 3, 2008   Writer
I like the clean look, but the design raises more questions than it answers.

Websites are, or at least should be, about so much more than the home page. This is a nice home page, but what about the rest of the site?

I assume that for other pages you'd dump that big brown zone at the top, but then what do you do with the tagline: "since 1992 we have kept the earth green"? And do you have the newsletter sign up on only the home page, or on all pages? As a home page element that brown zone is fine and has an open feel, but reproduced on every page it simply takes too much space above the fold.

The green bars at the top and bottom tie together nicely, but their widths and heights are off. Looking at the thumbnail (or pushing back and squinting at the page) it looks like an upside down "T". What do you think of the idea of cutting the width of the bottom bar? Leave the pot where it is and let it hang over the right end of the bar. BTW, I like the full-width brown bars top and bottom on your "Real Estate Concept" design.

The colors are good and I like the green, brown, white, green motif. I like the offset plant in the lower right-hand corner, although I don't think it could survive there on all pages. Also, its perspective seems odd. I like the subtle white on white background to the right of the page, and the ivy behind the gray boxes. The white on white might look good as a strip that flows across the whole width of the screen.

The white above the top green bar lightens up the weight of the top of the page, although it does waste valuable space. I like to put some space below my footer, which lets people scroll the page up a bit and keeps the bottom edge of the footer off the bottom edge of the browser window.

That bottom green bar seems awfully tall, and that customer quote is in huge type, especially when you compare it to the company name. I feel most corporate websites should not run ads--but it could be an ad for their own stuff, so it works. Perhaps the green bar's height could be shrunk down to the height of the ad, and leave a bit of white below... that is, position the pot so it centered on the height of the bottom green bar.

Not sure what the gray boxes are for on the right. Pictures of their latest plants with links to catalog pages? To give the site some visual interest, how about making the text on the left about 55 to 60% of the page width and the gray boxes the remainder.

When making "typical" web page designs it's hard to imagine what the site would look like without having typical content to go with. Since Noble Designs is supposed to be real someday, maybe think up some content for that site and use it to illustrate your typical designs. Some pages are insanely short, some seem to go on forever. Some need lots of pics, some need none. Some have freeform information, some have lots of little fiddly bits best placed into the structure of a table. Some are pure corporate, some are loaded with 3rd party ads. The result is that one pretty layout cannot possibly fit all.

I'm not a potential client of any website designers--I like to roll my own. But if I were looking over a designer's portfolio I'd be far more impressed by seeing how each design works with a variety of pages than simply flipping through a slide show of home pages.

Hope there's something you can use.
Reply
:iconusernamedesired:
usernamedesired Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008
Awesome, very clean, crisp, and professional looking :D
On the quote in the green bar on the bottom, there shouldn't be an apostrophe in "plant's", it should just be "plants." I don't know if it matters or not, but since it's for your college portfolio I thought I'd tell you just it case.
Reply
:icona-lady-writing:
A-Lady-Writing Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008
this is nice, it has a nice 'clean' and 'fresh' feeling to it.

beautifully done.

Cheers!

[A-Lady-Writing] :phae:

feel free to check out my gallery! :gallery:
Reply
:iconblade6420:
Blade6420 Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008
If someone hasn't mention this, I suppose I'll point it out now. "plant's" in the footer testimonial should be "plants". Other than that, very clean cut, but the texture behind the plant at the bottom is a bit distracting. Effective colour scheme though.

Congrats on the DD. :nod:
Reply
:iconpickle:
pickle Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008  Professional Interface Designer
Glad to see I wasn't the only one to catch that.
Reply
:iconkip0130:
Kip0130 Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008
thanks :) I work on these at night so my punctuation isn't the best.
Reply
:iconarcticphoenixstudios:
arcticphoenixstudios Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008  Professional General Artist
I find it amusing that you put the history of Lorem Ipsum there in place of the "traditional" text. Though, I will add that doing that can pose a risk as anything that is readable will likely be read and may detract from your design, which in a portfolio, is not necessarily what you want, hence the use of loop lines in manually created mock ups.
Reply
:iconkip0130:
Kip0130 Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008
Yes that is true I do that because if i use too much Lipsum I go nuts , my layer pallet says Lorem ipsum so i don't know what I'm moving around. But the portfolio submission has Lipsum in it :)
Reply
:iconarcticphoenixstudios:
arcticphoenixstudios Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008  Professional General Artist
*lol* Aye. I could see that.
Good, good.
Congrats on the DD. :)
Reply
:iconsimplyknownaskat:
SimplyKnownAsKat Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008  Professional Digital Artist
It has a very clean feel to it, and the color scheme and the fonts are a good choice. One suggestion I would make is perhaps a different sans-serif font? Other than that, a good portfolio piece!
Reply
:iconkip0130:
Kip0130 Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008
Ahh yea Tahoma is getting old. but i love it at small sizes ( no AA on ) what do you suggest?
Reply
:iconsimplyknownaskat:
SimplyKnownAsKat Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008  Professional Digital Artist
If you have it, maybe Hypatia Sans Pro. And good luck with the portfolio (I'm trying to put one together for a masters)!
Reply
:iconkanaev:
kanaev Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008
nice site... remings me of ArtLebedev work... good for general PR, bad for tons of content!
Would love to see the final result
Reply
:iconkip0130:
Kip0130 Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008
Thank you.
Reply
:icondarkdesyre:
Darkdesyre Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008
I think the design is very clean, and the negative spaces work well for me. What looks off is the thick header, it makes the design look top heavy. But a great design, I love the small elements that break away from the design. This of course is coming from a design teacher and not a web programmer so take it for what its worth! Grats on the DD hun!
Reply
:iconkip0130:
Kip0130 Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008
I feel the same way about the top heavyness that's why I made the footer Bigger and wider to balance it out.
May I ask what do you teach? and I would love any tips and advice you have as I am going to be applying to art school soon.
Reply
:icondarkdesyre:
Darkdesyre Featured By Owner Aug 5, 2008
I teach photoshop, Illustrator, drawing and design! Let me know if you ever have questions, Im always happy to help!
Reply
:iconscottydm:
ScottyDM Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008   Writer
Is the brown part of the header? I get the feeling that it would only appear on the home page. Perhaps the green footer should more properly match the green header, which I assume would appear on every page.
Reply
:icondampes8n:
DampeS8N Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008
Like I advise everyone going into web design. Move towards the development angle. When you do design, don't do graphic design. The web is FAST moving away from static width sites and lots of graphics. Site owners are slowly but fanatically realizing that they are not print, and don't need to be grounded in traditional graphic design anymore. Invest in learning how to design for fluid, scalable, and stretchable layouts. Learn when less is more, and how to design for 508 compliance.

It is these things that will get you high-paying jobs when you leave school. It is these things the big-time companies are looking for. They have enough people who can churn out good looking static designs. What they need is someone who can churn out websites, not magazine layouts.

Unfortunately, all too often are my suggestions scoffed at. Be warned, the day of the 'web designer' is coming to an end, the rise of the 'web developer' and 'interaction designer' has overtaken it. People are realizing that slick graphics don't actually matter one Iota on the web. People gravitate towards the product, not the packaging, and you will have to be able to promote that product, rather than detracting from it.
Reply
:iconarctictransfuse:
arcticTransfuse Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008
Sound advice... and good thinking. Thanks for that; you've got me thinking too now.
Reply
:iconborysses:
borysses Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008
New generation browsers support full re-rendering (txt and pics) when you want to scale it up or down. It looks like this is the end of problems with fixed width designs.
Reply
:icondampes8n:
DampeS8N Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008
Don't be so sure. Most people don't upgrade quickly, and the way that firefox 3 has 2 options for upscale, and IE 7 a completely different 3rd, the time for well-formatted fluid/scalable pages is even more upon us. Don't forget that the way the browsers scale pages can be unpredictable. Take, for example, how IE 7 upscales Netflix. The Javascript popups for details don't connect properly, and there are many other issues. And when you add in multiple kinds of systems, like flash/ajax combos, you end up with lots of page-break when you don't plan for upscale.

So, assuming that your fixed-width page will upscale nicely on any browser with scaling isn't a good assumption. You have to test, and redesign.

It is far easier, and far better practice, to design for these possible issues. You don't end up with a site that looks like a painting, but you end up with a site that is useful and doesn't break. Clearly, the second option is better. If you have the best looking site on earth for selling yachts, but your generally 50+ customers can't read it, and it breaks when they upscale, you won't sell many yachts. As people who are tech-savvy get older and older, they require more and more in the way of accommodation, and let's not forget the people who won't be seeing your site at all. The ones using screen readers.

Looking professional is of course important, but google looks professional, amazon looks professional, there is no reason that minimal and useful can't be professional.
Reply
:iconborysses:
borysses Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008
I can't argue with that :D

But in my opinion it will be far better if browser developers will start to really obey unified standards.

New media gives us a lot of possibilities, but from the perception point of view we should be as close as possible to traditional "paper and ink" considering limitation of 72dpi.

It is a need to use a lot of hacks to force stuff to work and look as we want.

Typography is the think that can be really screwed if you want to use fluid designs.

But with out no doubt we should learn all the time to get familiar with all possible techniques to make websites as user friendly as it shall be.

Very few websites visitors are designers, so they my not dig fancy designs.
Reply
:icondampes8n:
DampeS8N Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008
Most users don't notice designs as more than novelty. However, they pick your site of another because of usability. Even when they don't understand the rules. If you design your site properly, you don't have problems with typography. It all comes down to being good at your job. And while web designers are really good at graphic design. That is no longer what the web is about, nor should it be.

Modern browsers are much better about rendering standard HTML and CSS these days. Provided you use the right Doctypes and stick to CSS 1. When you use CSS 2 standards, you run into some problems. Browsers are moving closer to the standard, however, there is no standard for how zooming and scaling should function.

I don't think we should be designing as close to paper and ink as possible. That ignores all the wonderful power of computers. Paper and ink design schemes are one of the things that have held computers back from their full potential. However, this is really a WHOLE nother topic.

Websites are software, they should look like software. They should look like they are on a computer. They should FUNCTION better than most software. But then again, most software should function better too.
Reply
:iconarctictransfuse:
arcticTransfuse Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008
I think you kind of missed what he was trying to say.
Reply
:iconpoultrychamp:
PoultryChamp Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008  Hobbyist Photographer
I 10000% agree.

I've spent months, and am still learning, the most effective way to do 100% layouts. With dozens of different screen resolutions now, it's important to have a dynamic design.

I don't think this design really qualifies for a DD. I know thousands of others who would be better qualified for a DD. =|
Reply
:iconlemontea:
lemontea Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008
Well, if you have a problem with my selections, you can take it up with me.

And if you know thousands of other people who deserve them, why not send them in.
Reply
:icondampes8n:
DampeS8N Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008
I don't think that is fair. DDs aren't just about humping web-celebs and placing the absolute best of us on a pedestal, they are also about showcasing new and interesting takes on things, and new artists that show promise.
Reply
:iconpoultrychamp:
PoultryChamp Featured By Owner Aug 3, 2008  Hobbyist Photographer
I don't also have to hump each DD receiver. Just because I don't think it deserves a DD doesn't mean I don't like it. It looks nice. But when there are tons of nice designs that show talent in the design and coding process on the front page of Recent at any given moment, I don't see why this one would receive a DD. The designer has some good eyes for general layout but stuffing stock photos in there and using a simple gradient isn't cutting it for me.
Reply
:icondampes8n:
DampeS8N Featured By Owner Aug 3, 2008
Maybe it isn't. But why do you have to SAY it? You don't need to voice everything that you think. There is no real value in saying that, all it does is cut the artist down. He didn't ask to get a DD, and as a nice gift he gets insulted for getting it. Do you see?

And the fact is, DDs aren't just for mind-blowing art. They are for potential up-and-comers also.
Reply
:iconkip0130:
Kip0130 Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008
Thank you for your advice , I will take your suggestions to heart as they will help me grow as a web designer , I can design fluid sites i just don't enjoy doing so. Also I am learning Front-end development ( I have 2 of the 3 layers of front-end development ( XHTML , CSS ) and I'm now learning JavaScript ).

I've always gone by less is more but i took the time to do a "flashy" web design for my submission to schools that I am applying too just to say I can do it.
Reply
:icondampes8n:
DampeS8N Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008
It is good to be diverse, but making a good argument against the status quo is the best way to get noticed when it comes to entrance to a good school. Don't be afraid to be bold.

That said, if you don't like the water, get out of the pool. There are still plenty of work in magazines and print-art. If what you enjoy the most is static pages, that is where you'll make the biggest splash. Do feel like you have to jump on this web design ship. It is sinking fast. My estimate is that within 5 years, you won't see any serious work done by web designers. Just government and small business jobs. And within 15 years they will all have caught on. Of course, there will be a whole new paradigm by then anyway.

You have to remain fluid. This industry is not for the slow to react. If you aren't capable of becoming an expert in a language or program in 6 months, you'll want to look somewhere else. That is, if you are looking to retire one day.

Nothing is stable in the computer world. We all act like the web is here to stay, but in as little as 5 years you could see an entirely new technology come by and sweep-kick the www. Be it stand-alone software that connects to the internet to get content. Or better, the end of the PC entirely. There is a lot of evidence to say that the next step in computing will be cloud-based. Your PC will simply be a gateway to a rich internet world with its own processing and software. And you'll connect to it more like you would VPN or Remote Desktop. This would also mean the end of the www as we know it.

Be fluid.
Reply
:iconscottydm:
ScottyDM Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008   Writer
I am not an artist or a graphical designer, so most of my sites come out rectilinear, functional, and content-heavy, and my content tends to be textual. I barely know color theory, but I think I've managed to avoid yucky color schemes. I would like to learn to do prettier sites--but not at the expense of content or usability.


Dynamic (fluid width) Sites:

You are correct when you say that a computer screen is *nothing* like paper. You have no control over the width, available fonts, color purity, or the sightedness of the viewer. The best advice is to not stress over details you can't control--or get into print media. But, must every website be fluid width?

I think that depends on the nature of the content. It would be insane for dA trying to shoehorn all this stuff, some of it variable width, into a fixed width site, but on the other hand, parts of dA are fixed width (floated to the center). For example these comment boxes.

Let's talk text. If your column width is too narrow the reader ends up scrolling a lot, which is unnecessary. But if the column width is too wide (in terms of characters per line) then it becomes too easy to get lost when scanning back and forth and the text becomes unreadable. With text, fluid column width is probably best tied to font size, which can be selected via a JS control on the site (selecting a style sheet). I've only just learned it's possible, and haven't tried it yet, but I understand you can set min and max widths in CSS. Might be nice for a fluid layout constrained to fit within usable parameters.

A couple of years ago I did a catalog-style site for my cousin, who's a sculptor. Went with one page layout for general-purpose pages and a different layout for his catalog pages. The banner, footer, colors, and fonts were common to both page types. Catalog pages have top navigation (cookie crumb on left and "previous/next" on right), below that a fixed-width photo on the left (350 px wide) and a table with object information on the right (400 px wide). Megapixel versions of his pictures open in a separate window. Do those pages need dynamic width?

I'm working on a site now... well, actually I'm supposed to be working on a site now, but I'm procrastinating. Anyway, it's a short story contest site so the useful content is 100% text (one of these days I've got to get a few illustrations to dress the place up). Banner at the top, below that is a narrow left-hand column for widgets (log on/off and navigation, but more coming) and a wide right-hand column for content, and below the two columns is the footer. Some pages are short and some can be quite tall--upper limit for stories is 3,500 words and I show the whole story on one page. Other than diddling the text size (default is 14 px Verdana for content), why would this site want a fluid width?

That said, the layout of the short story site is sort of ugly--rectangles within rectangles. So after I get this month's server-side scripting project done I'll hit the CSS again.
Reply
:icondampes8n:
DampeS8N Featured By Owner Aug 3, 2008
The idea is the page should make sense, and utilize all the available options that would make it function better. When we talk about fixed width sites, we typically mean sites that lock the page width to something like 1024 and ignore everything else. Especially when there was no thought on the site being scaled at all. A proper modern site will have content to fill the window. That doesn't mean stretch text to fill the screen, it means it will use all the space for something. I guess a good example is my blog [link] but there are lots of others and I'm sure my blog isn't perfect.
Reply
:iconliviania:
Liviania Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008
Looks nice, but you have a lot of white space on the edges, particularly on the left. At first it looks fine, but then those places draw the eye.
Reply
:iconkip0130:
Kip0130 Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008
I do have a lot of white space but i feel in this design it works to it's benefit.
Reply
:iconblasianonna:
blasianonna Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008  Hobbyist Digital Artist
This is a great design! And I was born in 92 XD
Reply
:iconkip0130:
Kip0130 Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2008
me too :)
Reply
Add a Comment: